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On Air: $25,000 Available for Projects Engaging Youth to Address Local Watershed Challenges
NY Great Lakes Basin Small Grants Program - News

Contact:
 
Dave White, New York Sea Grant, Recreation and Tourism Specialist, P: 315-312- 3042, E: dgw9@cornell.edu

Syracuse, NY, April 23, 2021 - New York Sea Grant has partnered with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation to offer grants of up to $25,000 for project that engage youth under the age of 21 with local watershed challenges. 

Dave White is New York Sea Grant's Coastal Recreation and Tourism Specialist. 

The deadline for proposals is April 30th. See more at www.nyseagrant.org/glsmallgrants.

This information was shared during a boating segment that aired on several 93Q programs, including Street Talk and Ted and Amy in the Morning. 93Q broadcasts on WNTQ-FM in the greater Syracuse region. 

The 8 and 1/2 minute segment, which can be streamed below, airs at around 10 minutes and 29 seconds into the broadcast and runs until around 19 minutes 6 seconds.

You can listen to White's full conversation on 93Q ...


If you don't see the player above, it's because you're using a non-Flash device (eg, iPhone or iPad). You can download the mp3 file by clicking here (mp3). It may take a few minutes to download, so please be patient.

Full Transcript:

Speaker1: [00:00:16] Welcome to Street Talk, a public affairs presentation of Cumulus Media, aired on our Cumulus stations in Syracuse. Street Talk is a weekly show keeping you in touch with individuals and organizations that work for and serve our community, we're your hosts, Ted and Amy. 

Speaker1: [00:10:29] New York Sea Grant has partnered with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation to offer grants of up to $25,000 for projects that engage youth under the age of 21 with local watershed challenges. Dave White is New York Sea Grant's Coastal Recreation and Tourism specialist.

Speaker4: [00:10:46] We are excited in partnership with New York State DEC, New York Sea Grant manages a program called the New York Great Lakes Basin Small Grant Program. And we are right now having our request for projects out, seeking proposals [00:11:00] for folks to really look at what some of the watershed issues are in the Great Lakes. And the project has to engage youth under the age of 21 in the project. And in this case, it is what I call conception to conclusion that we really want the youth involved in the planning, the implementation, the practicality of it, the evaluation, whatever it might be. They need to be included from point A to point Z. And, you know, many times when we do a project  [00:11:30]we'll involve the youth in participating and helping do planting or helping them clear a trail, whatever it might be. They have to be involved in the entire process as part of this program. And that just really excites me because it's an opportunity for our youth to participate and really understand what it takes to do some of the kind of activities we do and along our water bodies or in our water bodies.

Speaker3: [00:11:52] Now, explain to me, and this is probably a silly question, but watershed challenges, what does that exactly mean?

Speaker4: [00:11:58] You know, if folks look at the Great [00:12:00] Lakes Action Agenda and the sub basin work group list, it's like, what is challenging our watersheds? what are some of the water quality issues? What are some of the invasive species issues? What are some of the resiliency, climate change issues? What are some of the access, recreation, tourism issues? So when we think, you know, again, it's watershed wide. So it's not just the lake/land interface along Erie, Ontario, Niagara, St. Lawrence Rivers, you know, it's the entire watershed, which includes Onondaga Lake, Oneida Lake, the Finger Lakes. In any project I've mentioned [00:12:30] because I used to do some work with it is what we used to call the big lake - little lake interaction is, you know, Onondaga Lake or Oneida Lake are the little lakes in this case to the big lake, Lake Ontario. But they're connected, you know, so things that happened in Onondaga or on Oneida Lake or Cross Lake, Finger Lakes, they they then impact the Great Lakes, Lake Ontario. So, you know, big lake / little lake project. In really looking at what are some of the either impairments or what are some of the opportunities, because it's just a wealth of opportunity. So, you know, I [00:13:00] see a group saying, this should be a really great location for a water trail. Here's the access point, but we want to identify some things that are along it. You know, here's a great place that needs some habitat restoration. But again, the exciting part of this is for either formal or informal youth groups to come together to really plan, implement and evaluate the whole process. I get excited about a lot of things. This one really excites me because of that aspect of it.

Speaker3: [00:13:28] And let's talk about who is eligible. I mean, besides [00:13:30] you. But, you know, you talk about formal and informal groups like who should be looking at that?

Speaker4: [00:13:35] You know, it's really wide open. I've been having conversations with a lot of folks. I mean, obviously, school-based programs, be it an environmental science club or a school that wants to do something through their science program, you know, an agriculture program in their FFA organization. A 4H Club. I've even talked to some U.S. Coast Guard auxiliaries and power squadrons about the opportunities for boating issues and providing opportunities for youth to get engaged in boating activities, [00:14:00] developing boating opportunities. So it's really wide open, the real goal is to engage the youth and we define that as under the age of 21, you know, in the entire project. So, you know, we're looking at a wide range of folks that might apply, obviously, non-for-profits that are out there, an Oneida Lake Association in our case or local soil and water conservation district, cooperative extension, they're all welcome to apply. It's just really this very unique focus. And I've been doing [00:14:30] this a long time and I haven't seen many RFPs that are out there that really focus on the engagement of youth from cradle to grave conception to conclusion, whatever terms you want to use, because that to me is when the review team looks at it. That's going to be the critical piece they're going to look at is are they involved in all those aspects? Because that's where they're going to learn team building. They're going to learn networking. And, you know, I could see some projects coming in where they then have to go to the town board and make a presentation, maybe so just all of those other things that come with it. So, watershed, [00:15:00] it's learning about our water resources. It's learning about the impairments and opportunities, but it's also learning all those other life skills that are so critical as they become the next, you know, the future leaders of the Great Lakes.

Speaker3: [00:15:11] Well, let's talk about when these applications are due and when the product, should you be accepted, have to be conducted.

Speaker4: [00:15:17] Absolutely. The proposals are due April 30th, and all of the information that they need is online at www.nyseagrant.org. If they have questions, [00:15:30] they can call me through the process. But all of the information, all the forms are online. We'll then have the review team look at them. The successful projects will begin as early as July 1st of this year. And we've set it up that it's an 18 month program so they don't have to complete it until December 31st of 2022. And I really wanted to make sure they had time to do that because we're asking them to engage the students. But this gives them two full summers. So they have to do some preliminary work this summer and then, you know, fully build it out, whatever [00:16:00] they might do next summer. It involves an entire school year if it's a school-based activity. So we really wanted to give them time to do that, to get the students involved and to really help make it a success. So, you know, this time next year, we'll be talking about hopefully some really great projects that are underway that they'll be out doing. And, across the entire basin area, like I said, Erie, Ontario, the two big rivers and the entire watershed of the Finger Lakes area,

Speaker3: [00:16:25] It's pretty cool. What kind of funding are we talking about, Dave?

Speaker4: [00:16:29] We have $25,000 [00:16:30] available for each project and we're going to be able to fund up to eight projects, which, for a lot of these kind of things, that's that's a good amount of money. I mean, it costs money to do stuff. And we all know that. But, to engage the students. So we're looking to fund eight projects up to 25,000 apiece and get them underway by July 1st. And, I'm just really excited, having been a teacher way, way back when in my career. I'm just an FFA advisor. I [00:17:00] mean, I'm thinking of this going, "wow, if I was back in that business, what a great opportunity to engage my students in some real hands-on practical opportunity right here in their backyard to learn about what some of these issues are, to engage in them and provide solutions. And, I was talking to somebody the other day. I said I could see some really cool new technologies being talked about, you know, with them. Maybe doing some stuff with, making ROVs and putting them out there in the water like we did. You know, you'll remember a few years [00:17:30] back at the state fair where we we had kids building remote operated vehicles and demonstrating them at the fair. It's really endless. And with all these new technologies that are out there, it would be cool to see some of them say, how do we how do we utilize some of these new technologies for solving Great Lakes problems or enhancing Great Lakes opportunities, because you'll always hear me use those words together. Do we have problems, sure. But, do we have great opportunities. Absolutely. So, you know, look at both sides of the coin. Is it going to solve a problem that creates an opportunity. So you can hear [00:18:00] it in my voice. I know.

Speaker3: [00:18:01] No, I mean, I think about this stuff, too, and I think you're right. In a year or later on once the project is chosen, it's going to be so fun to talk about them. So I'm right there with you.

Speaker4: [00:18:12] You know, we'll get some of them on the air with you as well. And, you can talk to some of the students as well. And that's what excites me, to think about a student being on with you, talking about a project that they were a team leader on. That they really worked with their entire group to put together. I guess I can see myself sitting there listening on the radio [00:18:30] going, yeah, Amy, way to go. You're not talking to me anymore. You're talking to real-world people.

Speaker3: [00:18:37] Well, I go to, like, middle school science fairs, or I have, we haven't this year. But I look at their ideas and it's like, you know. So, I can imagine opening this up to high school and college kids and groups. And I think they probably will have some amazing ideas.

Speaker4: [00:18:51] Right. Right. That's that's what I'm excited to see. I'm really excited to see what they come forward with, because for us, this is the first time we've done this kind [00:19:00] of thing.

Speaker1: [00:19:02] Again, the deadline for proposals is April 30th, See more at www.nyseagrant.org. 


Sound Clips from the Interview:

1: These Small Grants Are All About the Youth 2:31

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Full Transcript: 

Speaker1: [00:00:00] And all right, youth and those who work with youth, New York see Grant is requesting proposals for projects that engage youth under the age of 21 when it comes to local watershed challenges with an opportunity to receive a grant of up to $25,000 to make it happen. Dave White is New York Sea Grant's coastal recreation and tourist specialist. He explains that this grant is all about the youth.

Speaker2: [00:00:54] The project has to engage youth under the age of 21. And in this case, it is what I call conception to conclusion that we really want the youth involved in the planning, the implementation, the practicality of it, the evaluation, whatever it might be. They need to be included from point A to point Z. And, you know, many times when we do a project we'll involve the youth in participating and helping do planting or helping them clear a trail, whatever it might be. They have to be involved in the entire process. [00:00:30]

Speaker1: [00:00:55] Wow. And how much do they get? Well, they have some grants and they could get up to $25,000. [00:01:00] I mean, when you think about what a project takes. It's not gonna be done for $500. So they're looking for submissions through the end of April. And I had to look up because, you know, I was trying to talk talk watersheds today to Dave White. Do you know what a watershed is? I have no idea. All right. It makes it much easier because, you know, he was throwing that around. And I'm like, what is that even? A watershed is an area of land that drains or sheds into a body of water. Oh, so [00:01:30] it's much easier because you're like what? But every single body of water has a watershed, which is the land around it, which eventually I mean, you know, it could it could drain into a stream which drains into a lake, which drains into an ocean. So, a watershed is just the area of land around it. Oh, I thought it you a small out-building that had a pump in it. Right. Right. And, you know, so then I said, "so, a watershed." And he launches into it, and so, I really had to just look it up. But now it all makes sense. Like we have a pond so the water around [00:02:00] it is shedding into the pond, it drains and goes into other things. Makes it much easier. I feel so much smarter. Me, too. I know it. And I mean, obviously we're known for all the central New York waterways around here, which are all connected in one way or another. So if you'd like more information, you know, those of you that are maybe teaching kids under the age of 21 or a municipality even, I mean, there's no one that is not eligible. You just have to include the youth from beginning to end, all of it. All of it is right up on our Ted & Amy Facebook page. 

2: Which Kinds of Projects Are Sea Grant Looking For? 2:53


If you don't see the player above, it's because you're using a non-Flash device (eg, iPhone or iPad). You can download the mp3 file by clicking here (mp3). It may take a few minutes to download, so please be patient.

Full Transcript: 

Speaker1: [00:00:00] Ok, youth and those who work with Youth, New York Sea Grant is requesting proposals for projects that engage youth under the age of 21 when it comes to local watershed challenges. What did we learn a watershed is, Ted? Well, that's where my dad threatened to take me if I misbehaved. It's actually an area of land that drains or sheds into a body of water. So every body of water has a watershed. The things we learn, right. Well, if [00:00:30] you can put together a project for local watershed challenges, you have an opportunity to receive a grant of up to $25,000 to make it happen. Dave White is New York Sea Grant's coastal recreation and tourism specialist. He explains kind of what type of projects they're looking for.

Speaker2: [00:01:23] What is challenging our watersheds? what are some of the water quality issues? What are some of the invasive species issues? What are some of the resiliency, climate change issues? What are some of the access, recreation, tourism issues? So when we think, you know, again, it's watershed wide. So it's not just the lake/land interface along Erie, Ontario, Niagara, St. Lawrence Rivers, you know, it's the entire watershed, which includes Onondaga Lake, Oneida Lake, the Finger Lakes. Onondaga Lake or Oneida Lake are the little lakes in this case to the big lake, Lake Ontario. But they're connected, you know, so things that happened in Onondaga or on Oneida Lake or Cross Lake, Finger Lakes, they they then impact the Great Lakes, Lake Ontario. [00:01:00]

Speaker1: [00:01:24] How about Lake Robins, which is located on your property? Well, it's a pond. I do have a watershed, though. It [00:01:30] turns out once I had to look up what watershed is. But, you know, I know this sounds like very complex, but those that are into that kind of thing.And you have to engage youth from beginning to end. That's what the kind of unique project is. You can get up to $25,000 grant to complete it. And, you know, so we say, oh, good God, that's why we're on the radio. You look at that science fair that we went and judged a couple of years ago. It was a middle school science fair. And these kids are absolutely amazing with the ideas that they create. So, [00:02:00] I mean, this would be like a great Earth science project. I mean, it's just that it has got to engage kids that are working from beginning to end. And and what's really neat, I think, is once they choose those that receive the grants we're actually going to see it happen. So, again, us from beginning to end. But the link to find out more, the deadline is the end of this month, April 30th. So I was trying to give you some time [00:02:30]. Actually, the entire interview with Dave White is going to be on our public affairs program this coming Sunday, if you want to hear more. OK, very good.

3: Who Is Eligible to Apply? 2:28

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Full Transcript: 

Speaker1: [00:00:00] All right, youth and those who work with youth, we've been talking about this all morning. New York Sea Grant is requesting proposals for projects that engage youth under the age of 21 when it comes to local watershed challenges with an opportunity to receive a grant of up to $25,000 to make it happen. They're working with the New York State DEC and Dave White, New York Sea Grant's Coastal Recreation and Tourism specialist. He explains who is eligible.

Speaker2: [00:00:59] It's really wide open. I've been having conversations with a lot of folks. Obviously, school-based programs, be it an environmental science club or a school that wants to do something through their science program, you know, an agriculture program in their FFA organization. A 4H Club. I've even talked to some U.S. Coast Guard auxiliaries and power squadrons about the opportunities for boating issues and providing opportunities for youth to get engaged in boating activities, developing boating opportunities. So it's really wide open, the real goal is to engage the youth and we define that as under the age of 21, you know, in the entire project. [00:00:30]

Speaker3: [00:01:00] There you go. I [00:01:00] can think of 25,000 reasons why you'd want your youth involved.

Speaker1: [00:01:04] Pretty fun. And maybe even if you're working at a nonprofit or even a municipality, I mean, it's not like it's got to be a classroom, but I mean, like broach the students. What kind of ideas do you have regarding the central New York waterways? And I might have been the only one who didn't know what a watershed was. I had to look it up. But a watershed is the body of land around any sort of waterway that sheds or drains [00:01:30] into a waterway. All right.

Speaker3: [00:01:33] Well, you know, we've got some great science schools in the area.

Speaker1: [00:01:35] I know. I mean, I mentioned that middle school science group that knocked our socks off. So even though we're going, "uh, build a giant beaver dam," you know what I mean? Like, I don't think I would have an idea. But I mean, the fact that you not only would think about the project, but get the money to complete that project. That's pretty awesome, right? The deadline is April 30th, though. So the link to see much, much, much more about it is right up on our [00:02:00] Ted & Amy 93 Q Facebook page.

4: The Unique Part? How Involved Youth Are in the Process 1:32

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Full Transcript: 

Speaker1: [00:00:00] Ok, youth and those who work with Youth, New York Sea Grant is requesting proposals for projects that engage youth under the age of 21 when it comes to local watershed challenges with an opportunity to receive a grant of up to $25,000 with the New York Sea Grant and the State DEC to make it happen now. Dave White is representing New York Sea Grant. He says the unique part about this project is how much the youth are included.

Speaker2: [00:00:59] The engagement of youth from cradle to grave, conception to conclusion, whatever terms you want to use, because that to me is when the review team looks at it. That's going to be the critical piece they're going to look at is are they involved in all those aspects? Because that's where they're going to learn team building. They're going to learn networking. And, you know, I could see some projects coming in where they then have to go to the town board and make a presentation, maybe so just all of those other things that come with it. So, watershed, it's learning about our water resources. It's learning about the impairments and opportunities, but it's also learning all those other life skills that are so critical as they become the next, you know, the future leaders of the Great Lakes. [00:01:00]

Speaker1: [00:01:00] Ok, that's pretty cool. There you go. And we have a lot of smart kids under the age of 21 that could really think of some amazing projects about the waters, the central New York waters and the land surrounding them. So be thinking about that. The deadline is coming up at the end of this April. And again, you can read about it right up on our Ted & Amy 93Q Facebook page. But then you would get this grant money. And I think that they're thinking they're starting the projects later on this year. That would be impressive to see. Yeah, [00:01:30] you'll get to see it from beginning to end.


More Info: New York Sea Grant

New York Sea Grant (NYSG), a cooperative program of Cornell University and the State University of New York (SUNY), is one of 34 university-based programs under the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Sea Grant College Program.

Since 1971, NYSG has represented a statewide network of integrated research, education and extension services promoting coastal community economic vitality, environmental sustainability and citizen awareness and understanding about the State’s marine and Great Lakes resources.

Through NYSG’s efforts, the combined talents of university scientists and extension specialists help develop and transfer science-based information to many coastal user groups—businesses and industries, federal, state and local government decision-makers and agency managers, educators, the media and the interested public.

The program maintains Great Lakes offices at Cornell University, University at Buffalo, SUNY Oswego and the Wayne County Cooperative Extension office in Newark. In the State's marine waters, NYSG has offices at Stony Brook University in Long Island, Brooklyn College and Cornell Cooperative Extension in NYC and Elmsford and Kingston in the Hudson Valley.

For updates on Sea Grant activities: www.nyseagrant.org has RSS, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube links. NYSG offers a free e-list sign up via www.nyseagrant.org/nycoastlines for its flagship publication, NY Coastlines/Currents, which is published quarterly. Our program also produces an occasional e-newsletter, "NOAA Sea Grant's Social Media Review," via its blog, www.nyseagrant.org/blog.


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